Performing for the first time at The Founders room, Slaughterhäus Surf Cult are bringing two of their best mates – Cathy Diver and Emi Doi for an evening of rock n roll-pop-folk mayhem.

26 August 2022
7.30pm – 12 midnight
Doors 7pm
The Founders Room
Salamanca Arts Centre
Enter via Wooby’s Lane, or for lift access enter through The Courtyard

$10 Presales
$15 Door


Slaughterhäus Surf Cult
A Three piece garage outfit from Hobart that have been working since 2018 to develop an identifiably Tasmanian sound.
Their third and most recent EP, ‘Since Tyson Called Me A Bitch’, is an accurate representation of the band’s live sound and energy, with each song offering an introspective look into Australia’s southernmost state.
Taking influence from the likes of Eddy Current Suppression Ring and Constant Mongrel, ‘Slaughterhäus’ have been lucky enough to play with local, national and international artists and have also been on the bills at a festival called PANAMA, MONA FOMA, the Basin Concert, Falls Music and Arts Festival and Party in the Paddock.


Cathy Diver
Singer-songwriter Cathy Diver writes intimate alt-country and folk songs cast tender vignettes, shifting and sunburnt. Based between lutruwita/Tasmania and Ngunnawal Country, she has toured significantly and supported the likes of Julia Jacklin, Didirri, Tim Rogers and Carla Geneve, as well as co-forming indie label, Undine Records, in 2020.


エミエミ (emi emi)
エミエミ (emi emi)is the experimental J-pop project from 24-year-old Emi Doi. Born and raised in lutruwita to her Launcestonian mum and Japanese dad, エミエミ represents a new musical venture for Emi, combining her existing indie-music flavour with uptempo kawaii-pop, drawing on inspiration from the likes of Kero Kero Bonito, CHAI, Kyary Pyamu Pyamu and Superorganism. 楽しんでください (≧▽≦)


More Live Music in the Founders Room



This event is supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Regional Arts Fund
This is a rescheduled event from the performance was to be part of Winter Light in August 2022.

This concert, performed by Ensemble Mania, is the second in the String Quartet # 1 Project (which was launched at Salamanca Arts Centre in August 2021). Hear four composers first String Quartet – some performed for the first time in over 40 years – as part of Winter Light 2022.

Ensemble Mania comprise:
Peter Tanfield | 1st violin
Josh Farner | 2nd violin 
Damien Holloway | viola
James Anderson | ‘cello

This concert program showcases the first string quartets by four Tasmanian composers.

Hellgart Mahler         Icknield (quartet version)
Russell Gilmour        Five Reasons to Stay Home
Don Kay                   String Quartet: Opus Zero
Dominic Flynn          Mill

14 August 2022
6pm – 7.30pm
Doors at 5.30pm


Whilst the wearing of masks is not mandatory it is recommended in certain situations by Tasmanian Public Health.  Masks will be available upon entering the venue for those patrons who would like one.  

If you’re unwell, it is recommended that you stay at home, and we look forward to welcoming you at Salamanca Arts Centre another time.


About the composers

Hellgart Mahler lives near Devonport, Tasmania, but was born in Vienna. Her father, Hillel Mahler, came from a small village on the Polish-Czechoslovakian border, but his family soon moved to Vienna, then the cultural Mecca of Europe. In his grandfather’s family one older brother became the father of Gustav Mahler (who is Hellgart’s great-uncle), but her musical antecedents go right back to 16th and 17th century Italy, where the Maler family (the H was added later) were brilliant lute makers and players; sought after and vied for by dukes and princes.


Photo: Ingrid Rosenberg

Russell Gilmour was born in 1956 and received his early musical training at Guildford Grammar School, WA. Since graduating from the University of New England in the early 1980s, he has worked as a teacher, lecturer and arts administrator. Gilmour is best known for his short, quirky, humorous compositions (Dark on Bach, 2003) and sometimes melancholic, brooding work (Seven Things I’ll Do Tomorrow, 2005). His musical style has developed from a brief flirtation with neo-romanticism in the 1980s (A Peaceable Kingdom, 1985; Host Of The Air, 1984) to a more direct highly melodic style which the composer describes as ‘the art of post classical drivetime’


Photo: Dominic Flynn

Don Kay

Don Kay’s musical language has its roots in the tradition of Western art music but has been significantly shaped by his experience of Tasmania’s environment and history. Kay identifies Hastings Bay (1986) as the first mature piece that was a direct, conscious response to a specific personal experience of a specific place, acknowledged by the title. Two works, amongst a number important to him for reflecting this influence, are: Tasmania Symphony – the Legend of Moinee for cello and orchestra (1988), and Piano Trio, The Edge of Remoteness (1996).


Photo: Saxon Hornett

Dominic Fynn

Born in Hobart in 1997, Dominic Fynn grew up playing the drums in local bands before shifting focus to composition. Dominic’s music has been performed both locally and overseas, and he has collaborated with the Decibel New Music Ensemble, Hobart Wind Symphony, L’ Ensemble de Musique Contemporaine du Conservatoire de Musique de Rimouski, pianist Michael Kieran Harvey, and the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra.  In 2021 he received a grant to compose a string quartet inspired by convict folk music, and was selected to be a part of one of Australia’s largest commissioning projects, the ANAM Set. He has studied in Australia with Don Kay, Russell Gilmour, and Maria Grenfell, and in the United Kingdom with Michael Finnissy.


Biographies

Ensemble Mania was created with the goal to provide a unique listening experience in Tasmania, showcasing music that would otherwise not be heard on the island, while exemplifying the possibilities of a richer, more diverse music scene. This music includes the latest, most exciting composers, to the pillars of Australian modernism and lost masterpieces.


Photo: supplied by the artist

Peter Tanfield
Born in England in 1961, Peter Tanfield started the violin aged four. He studied in Germany, Israel, Switzerland and Holland where his teachers were Igor Ozim, Felix Andrievski, Alberto Lysy, Herman Krebbers and Yehudi Menuhin. As soloist and chamber musician Tanfield has performed throughout Europe, China, Japan, India, Canada, the Middle East, Africa, USA and USSR. He was a prize-winner at The Carl Flesh International Competition, International Mozart Competition and International Bach Competition. He has recorded solo and chamber works for television and radio as well as CD. He has played for Chairman Deng Xiaoping in China and the Sultan of Oman. Tanfield led the Australian String Quartet from 1998 until 2001. As a soloist Tanfield has appeared with many orchestras; the Philharmonia, City of London Sinfonia, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the RAI National Symphony Orchestra in Rome. As concertmaster he has worked with the BBC Philharmonic, RAI National Symphony Orchestra, Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Sinfonietta, and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra. He has performed with Astor Piazolla, Charlie Watts, Pinchas Zukerman, Yehudi Menuhin, Charles Wuorinen, Arvo Pärt, Graeme Koehne, Gary Carr, Carlo Maria Giulini, Mark Gasser and Itzhak Perlman.


Joshua Farner is from Hobart, Tasmania, and began playing the violin at the age of nine. Following completion of a Bachelor of Engineering with 1st class Honours, he was awarded a University of Tasmania String Scholarship and commenced a Bachelor of Music under the tutelage of Dr. Susan Collins. Josh has performed with the Tasmanian Discovery Orchestra and the Australian International Symphony Orchestra Institute (AISOI), and regularly performs as section leader and concertino player with the Hobart Chamber Orchestra. In 2018 Josh was awarded the D & MV McDonald Scholarship in Music from the University of Tasmania, allowing him to travel to London to study under renowned pedagogues Simon Fischer and David Takeno.


Damien Holloway studied viola in Hobart with Keith Crellin, Simon Oswell and Jan Sedivka, followed by postgraduate studies in Brisbane with Elizabeth Morgan. He played viola with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, and was a founding member of Camerata of St Johns (Brisbane). He is principal viola of the Hobart Chamber Orchestra, and regularly fosters the performance of new music


James Anderson is currently studying a Master of Teaching at the University of Tasmania, having completed his Bachelor of Music in 2018 studying under Sue-Ellen Paulsen. James has previously performed in the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, the Australian Youth Orchestra, the Australian International Symphony Orchestra Institute, the Jan Sedivka Camerata, and the Tasmanian Discovery Orchestra. In 2018 James worked with the ensemble Musik Fabrik in Cologne, while also spending time at the Royal Conservatory of Den Hague in the Netherlands.


Program notes

Mahler | Icknield
The Icknield quartet, and the quintet that followed, were both written for an English group of that name, who, although experts in the playing of early polyphonic music, were inexperienced in atonal music and contemporary rhythms. I tried to write firstly, a very short, straightforward, logical, polyphonic piece of music, avoiding difficulties in rhythmic coordination.

Gilmour | Five Reasons to Stay Home: [ pandemics notwithstanding ]

Kay | String Quartet: Opus Zero
String Quartet: Opus Zero was composed in 1961 during a few years of fairly exclusive use of the 12 tone technique advised and guided by Malcolm Williamson, my private and only teacher of composition, in London from 1959-1964. It was never performed, although my friend, John Cale, then a music student at Goldsmith College and later co-founder of the famous Velvet Underground rock band in New York, couldn’t find a second violinist to make up a quartet to try it out. It is only now being premiered because of the enterprise of Dominic Flynn (assisted by Nathan Meurant) in putting the pencilled score together and typesetting it 59 years later. I very recently subtitled it “Opus Zero” to distinguish it from the six later numbered string quartets starting in 1971. It is in four movements and applied 12-tone serial techniques, although not as strictly as in later works of that London period.

Flynn | Mill
This piece alludes to the fiddle music of Tasmanian convict composer Alexander Laing (1792-1868), specifically three tunes Laing composed while living in Sorell in the 1810s-’20s which exemplified his climbing of the social ladder in the town. This string quartet is an attempt to wrestle with our perception of such historical figures, given the grim history of colonial towns like Sorell. The subtitle ‘Mill’ is not only a reference to one of Laing’s tunes, but is also an apt metaphor of the ways in which the tunes have been processed in order to create the material for this string quartet. The piece has been composed in three movements, though the edges of these have been muddied with material leeching from one movement into the next.

Presented by Salamanca Arts Centre

This concert, performed by Ensemble Mania, is the third in the String Quartets # 1 Project (which was launched at Salamanca Arts Centre in August 2021). 

Three Tasmanian String Quartets # 1
Saturday 3 September
7:30pm – 9pm
Doors at 7pm
The Peacock Theatre

Ensemble Mania comprise
Peter Tanfield | 1st violin
Josh Farner | 2nd violin 
Damien Holloway | viola
James Anderson | cello

This concert program showcases the first string quartets by Tasmanian composers

Program

Simon Reade | String Quartet (Alba)

Marian Stankiewicz | Stanisław: String Quartet No. 1

Raffæle Marcellino | String Quartet No. 1

Program notes

Simon Reade – String Quartet (Alba)

Alba (Aubade)

Hyperion’s clear star is not yet risen.

Dawn brings a tenuous light across the earth,

The watcher to the sleeper cries, “Arise!”

Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;

She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!

Behold the ambush of the enemy

Stealing to take the heedless in their sleep,

And still the herald’s voice that cries “Arise!”

Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;

She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!

The North wind from Acturus now blows free,

The stars go into hiding in the sky,

And nearer to the sunrise swings the Plough.

Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;

She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!

(10th Century Manuscript,

English translation, Helen Waddell)


Marian Stankiewicz – Stanisław: String Quartet No. 1

Of the twelve works composed by Marian Stankiewicz in his short career, three are string quartets. The first of these is his 1974 quartet Stanisław, a name of Slavic origin that could be in reference to any number of people. The work is composed in four movements and employs some unique playing techniques and notation choices, particularly in the final movement which appears rhythmically freer with misaligned rhythmic values and very few barlines. (Program note by Dominic Flynn).


Raffæle Marcellino – String Quartet No. 1

This work was commissioned by Vincent Moleta for the 2003 Blackwood River Chamber Festival in West Australia, performed by Trigon Ensemble. The three movements are defined by their rhythmic style and temporal space. The musical premise for each movement can be described through the concepts of a:

1. dance, as a way of defining and traversing 2-dimensional space,

2. nocturne, with subtle lyricism as a proxy for moonlight and introspection, and

3. perpetuum mobile, of motoric iteration that defines space at the smallest dimension which invokes a larger continuum


Performers’ Biographies

Ensemble Mania was created with the goal to provide a unique listening experience in Tasmania, showcasing music that would otherwise not be heard on the island, while exemplifying the possibilities of a richer, more diverse music scene. This music includes the latest, most exciting composers, to the pillars of Australian modernism and lost masterpieces.

Born in England in 1961, Peter Tanfield started the violin aged four. He studied in Germany, Israel, Switzerland and Holland where his teachers were Igor Ozim, Felix Andrievski, Alberto Lysy, Herman Krebbers and Yehudi Menuhin. As soloist and chamber musician Tanfield has performed throughout Europe, China, Japan, India, Canada, the Middle East, Africa, USA and USSR. He was a prize-winner at The Carl Flesh International Competition, International Mozart Competition and International Bach Competition. He has recorded solo and chamber works for television and radio as well as CD. He has played for Chairman Deng Xiaoping in China and the Sultan of Oman. Tanfield led the Australian String Quartet from 1998 until 2001. As a soloist Tanfield has appeared with many orchestras; the Philharmonia, City of London Sinfonia, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the RAI National Symphony Orchestra in Rome. As concertmaster he has worked with the BBC Philharmonic, RAI National Symphony Orchestra, Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Sinfonietta, and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra. He has performed with Astor Piazolla, Charlie Watts, Pinchas Zukerman, Yehudi Menuhin, Charles Wuorinen, Arvo Pärt, Graeme Koehne, Gary Carr, Carlo Maria Giulini, Mark Gasser and Itzhak Perlman.


Joshua Farner is from Hobart, Tasmania, and began playing the violin at the age of nine. Following completion of a Bachelor of Engineering with 1st class Honours, he was awarded a University of Tasmania String Scholarship and commenced a Bachelor of Music under the tutelage of Dr. Susan Collins. Josh has performed with the Tasmanian Discovery Orchestra and the Australian International Symphony Orchestra Institute (AISOI), and regularly performs as section leader and concertino player with the Hobart Chamber Orchestra. In 2018 Josh was awarded the D & MV McDonald Scholarship in Music from the University of Tasmania, allowing him to travel to London to study under renowned pedagogues Simon Fischer and David Takeno.


Damien Holloway studied viola in Hobart with Keith Crellin, Simon Oswell and Jan Sedivka, followed by postgraduate studies in Brisbane with Elizabeth Morgan. He played viola with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, and was a founding member of Camerata of St Johns (Brisbane). He is principal viola of the Hobart Chamber Orchestra, and regularly fosters the performance of new music.


James Anderson is currently studying a Master of Teaching at the University of Tasmania, having completed his Bachelor of Music in 2018 studying under Sue-Ellen Paulsen. James has previously performed in the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, the Australian Youth Orchestra, the Australian International Symphony Orchestra Institute, the Jan Sedivka Camerata, and the Tasmanian Discovery Orchestra. In 2018 James worked with the ensemble Musik Fabrik in Cologne, while also spending time at the Royal Conservatory of Den Hague in the Netherlands.



Composers’ biographies

Simon Reade is a conductor, composer, educator, and trumpet player. He has filled commissions from the Tasmanian Youth Orchestra, the Festival of Voices (Tasmania), IHOS opera, the Hobart Chamber Orchestra, the Derwent Valley Band and the Tasmanian Composer’s Festival, amongst others. His music has been performed by such eminent performers as; Michael Kieran Harvey, Jabra Latham, Diego Campagna, Maurizio Barbetti, Duo Porto-Frontini, Luca Ferrini & Joze Kotar, Benjamin Price and Dr Matthew van Emmerik.



Marian Stankiewicz
 started his brief musical career at the age of fifteen by playing guitar with his father’s dance band. He enrolled at the Tasmanian Conservatorium of Music in 1972 to study classical guitar and composition, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Music in 1976. After graduation, Stankiewicz taught classical guitar at the Tasmanian Conservatorium of Music and appeared in a number of concert performances. He died in 1977, at the age of twenty-five.



Raffaele’s music embraces Western art music tradition with eclectic influences from other musical traditions such as jazz and non-western music and folk traditions. He studied composition at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, where his teachers included Richard Vella, Gillian Whitehead, Bozidar Kos and Richard Toop. Since graduation Raffaele has built a national and international profile as a composer in various genres of chamber music, orchestral music, opera, music theatre and radio works. He has been awarded various prizes and commissions, including an Australia Council Fellowship and the Lowin Prize for his work Canticle.
His music is available through the Australian Music Centre and Universal Music. He has written music for leading Australian and international artists and ensembles, including Ian Munro, The Seymour Group, the Song Company, Pipeline, Australia Ensemble, Halcyon, Sydney Philharmonia Choir and the Brandenburg Orchestra. Career highlights include a UNESCO-sponsored residency in Montreal with Nouvel Ensemble Moderne; the Melbourne Festival premiere of his opera Midnite; 10 Days on the Island premiere of The Flight of Les DarcyHeart of Fire music for the 2000 broadcast for the Sydney Paralympics; L’Arte di Volare performed by the Tasmanian Sydney Orchestra Strings; the Art of Resonance concerto for tuba performed by Steve Rosse and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra; and the ISCM performance of Maze by Ensemble Modern.


This event is presented by Salamanca Arts Centre and supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund

  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

International touring swamp-blues-rocker 8 Ball Aitken is bringing his party gig to Hobart on Friday July 14 at The Founders Room supported by mystical soul rocker Jessy Lynch.


Photo: image supplied by the artist

8 Ball Aitken

8 Ball Aitken has toured the world for more than a decade performing his swampy-blues-rock across twenty countries to date. He’s earned a loyal fanbase from his live shows and internet videos, while paying his dues as a singer, songwriter, slide-guitarist, and producer.  
8 Ball won second place in the 2021 International New Orleans Cigar Box Guitar Festival hosted by blues woman Samantha Fish. His album release ‘ICE CREAM MAN’ hit #1 on the Australian Blues & Roots Charts in March 2021.
8 Ball moved to Nashville, Tennessee, USA in 2012 and worked for nine years with many of the best in the blues business today.



Photo: image supplied by the artist

Jessy Lynch

Jessy Lynch is a mystical-rocker with a strong soulful voice. Originally from Cairns, she now calls the Sunshine Coast home. Over the past five years, Jessy has played at festivals such as Palm Creek Folk Festival, Coalescence, River Sessions, Rootbound, EcoFiesta, and the Tablelands Folk Festival. She launched her debut album and single ‘AFTERGLOW’ in 2020 to sold-out audiences. The album received radio airplay across Australia. Jessy is currently working on a second album


More Live Music in the Founders Room

Come to the Founders Room for The internationally acclaimed Adam Hall and the Velvet Playboys first time live in Tasmania!


The Velvet Playboys Orchestra featuring Adam Hall is an institution of the Australian vintage music scene and renowned for its captivating live performances.

The band’s repertoire is rooted in the Jazz and Rhythm & Blues music of the 40’s and 50’s, from artists such as Ray Charles, Frank Sinatra, Louis Prima, Sammy Davis Junior, Harry Connick Junior, Jackie Wilson, Chuck Berry and The Blues Brothers. They also include a large library of Adam Hall originals and unique arrangements, which can be found on their four albums.

With support from Konrad Park’s Big Small Band this promises to be a night to have you dancing in the aisles!


Artists

A group of white men in suits sit in a bar. One of them holds a trumpet.
Photo: Doris Brunet

Adam Hall & The Velvet Playboys

I can add to the list the outstanding showmanship of Australian jazz heroes, Adam Hall & the Velvet Playboys – Australian stage

In 2005 he formed a classic Rhythm & Blues band, Adam Hall & The Velvet Playboys. The band is an institution of the Australian vintage music scene.

Alongside Adam (Vocals, Trumpet) it features some of Australia’s finest musicians, including: 

Mark Turner | Guitar
Anthony Dodos | Trombone
Bronton Ainsworth | Drums
Kane Shaw | Double Bass
Tim Voutas | Keys


Konrad Park’s Big Small Band


More Live Music in the Founders Room

This event is presented by Salamanca Arts Centre

This concert program comprises songs, drawing on the enduring literary idea of love in an age of nobility and chivalry. Courtly love was an experience of erotic desire and spiritual attainment combined. It was “a love at once illicit and morally elevating, passionate and disciplined, humiliating and exalting, human and transcendent”. 

Sequenza’s program will include songs of courtly love from the baroque by Couperin, Dowland, Caccini and more.

Sequenza
Quin Thomson | voice
David Malone | lute
Brett Rutherford | viola da gamba
Matt Goddard | percussion 

Together, their passion for making great music, their fascination for ancient instruments and historically informed performance practice, and their drive to innovate, have brought them together to form Sequenza. From its first concert in 2015 Sequenza has showcased the extraordinary repertoire of the Baroque and earlier musical periods, right back to the Middle Ages and fostered the creative development of extraordinary new compositions. 


This concert program was originally to be part of Eclectica Salamanca: a Festival of Music from other Times, other Places, which was supported by the City of Hobart through its Cultural Grants Program and by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Proudly presented by Salamanca Arts Centre.

Come and hear some of Hobart’s finest Gypsy Jazz artists play a ‘session’ like you have never heard before!
Curated and hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy, members of the musical community are encouraged to join in, just like they did back in the day.
Expect to be wowed by the music of the 1930’s Parisian Belle Epoque’ (Beautiful Era). This is the music that Monet, Renoir, Degas, Picasso, and Van Gogh listened to when they were out and about on their adventures.

Everyone is welcome!

Want to play along too?

If you are interested in participating in these sessions, then please register your interest below and Charlie will put your name on the list, and make sure there is a seat available for you.



Hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy and featuring local and travelling musicians of the highest calibre, the Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions differ from a regular musical performance in a few key ways.

This Gypsy Jazz Jam is based on how the genre was originally encountered in the 1930’s Parisian social scene, around a campfire fire/table or in a bar or even backstage during a gig where the musicians were formally booked to play for dances and would jam backstage for fun.

The Musicians will be seated in a circle facing each other, unrehearsed but with common repertoire and familiar calls/instructions/signals for on-the-spot arrangement decisions. All tunes are played from memory, no charts, just a list of common songs and everyone leads the song they nominate. Musicians can take a break whenever they like but the music is pretty much continuous and other musicians and even members of the audience are encouraged to join in and participate also! BYO instrument!

The audience is invited to be close to the music, and can move around the musicians, with the option of changing location at any time, go to the bar and enjoy a drink, chat and interact with friends, get in close to the musician you want to observe the most.

This session will not be amplified so move up close to hear the music as loud as you like.

The main goal being more fun for all.


Why these sessions are so special
The musicians are more relaxed and will be more communicative and adaptable to variation in the moment, they will play uninhibited and take musical risks to the enjoyment of all.

The audience engages with the musicians directly. Chats between tunes, observing the interactions first hand and even getting involved if you bring your instrument.

You hear the true sound of the instrument directly from the instrument, no amplification, no feedback, so that when identical instruments are soloing you can clearly see/hear who is doing what. These instruments have been around for hundreds of years and are already the perfect volume for this kind of music.


The Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions are presented by Salamanca Arts Centre as part of its Live Music Program, which is supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Proudly presented by Salamanca Arts Centre.

Come and hear some of Hobart’s finest Gypsy Jazz artists play a ‘session’ like you have never heard before!
Curated and hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy, members of the musical community are encouraged to join in, just like they did back in the day.
Expect to be wowed by the music of the 1930’s Parisian Belle Epoque’ (Beautiful Era). This is the music that Monet, Renoir, Degas, Picasso, and Van Gogh listened to when they were out and about on their adventures.

Everyone is welcome!

Want to play along too?

If you are interested in participating in these sessions, then please register your interest below and Charlie will put your name on the list, and make sure there is a seat available for you.



Hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy and featuring local and travelling musicians of the highest calibre, the Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions differ from a regular musical performance in a few key ways.

This Gypsy Jazz Jam is based on how the genre was originally encountered in the 1930’s Parisian social scene, around a campfire fire/table or in a bar or even backstage during a gig where the musicians were formally booked to play for dances and would jam backstage for fun.

The Musicians will be seated in a circle facing each other, unrehearsed but with common repertoire and familiar calls/instructions/signals for on-the-spot arrangement decisions. All tunes are played from memory, no charts, just a list of common songs and everyone leads the song they nominate. Musicians can take a break whenever they like but the music is pretty much continuous and other musicians and even members of the audience are encouraged to join in and participate also! BYO instrument!

The audience is invited to be close to the music, and can move around the musicians, with the option of changing location at any time, go to the bar and enjoy a drink, chat and interact with friends, get in close to the musician you want to observe the most.

This session will not be amplified so move up close to hear the music as loud as you like.

The main goal being more fun for all.


Why these sessions are so special
The musicians are more relaxed and will be more communicative and adaptable to variation in the moment, they will play uninhibited and take musical risks to the enjoyment of all.

The audience engages with the musicians directly. Chats between tunes, observing the interactions first hand and even getting involved if you bring your instrument.

You hear the true sound of the instrument directly from the instrument, no amplification, no feedback, so that when identical instruments are soloing you can clearly see/hear who is doing what. These instruments have been around for hundreds of years and are already the perfect volume for this kind of music.


The Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions are presented by Salamanca Arts Centre as part of its Live Music Program, which is supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Stand up for peace with this fundraiser for Ukrainians displaced by the Russian invasion. 

Join Les Nointers, featuring Lucien Simon and Cameron Healy from seminal 90s Tasmanian misfit stagger rock outfit DUST, flamenco metal queen Katherine Diaz Robayo and drum slinger Marcos Genaris. They are joined on stage by the Interiors, who’ve risen from the ashes of All Fires the Fire, to create a new brand of dark splendour. Closing the night will be our very own Russian defector Comrade Xero spinning her collection of banned communist electronica. Special guests for the evening will be Koko Flow and her band of yogis and yogini’s who will open the night with a chant for peace.

Throughout the night will be projected  a range of video art from Black Paul, Troy Melville and Lucien Simon.

All funds raised will be donated to UNICEF’s support for Ukrainian families and children.

https://www.unicef.org/emergencies/war-ukraine-pose-immediate-threat-children



  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

More Live Music in the Founders Room

Lineage: Traditions 

[performance]

This event is part of Winter Light 2022 and is presented by Salamanca Arts Centre

Experience sounds and movements that are steeped in tradition – a world stage in nipaluna (Hobart).
Curated by Sharifah Emalia Al-Gadrie

Thursday 18 August 2022
6pm – 7.30pm


Whilst the wearing of masks is not mandatory it is recommended in certain situations by Tasmanian Public Health.  Masks will be available upon entering the venue for those patrons who would like one.  

If you’re unwell, it is recommended that you stay at home, and we look forward to welcoming you at Salamanca Arts Centre another time.


Photo: Karen Brown

​​Ehsan Zabihi and Sina Tarkesh Esfahani – Classical Iranian Music

This performance of Iranian classical music will be presented in two parts. The music will be improvised throughout. There will be sensory perceptions of the musicians in the performance of some pieces. Intertwined with the music the poems of great Persian poets such as Rumi, Khayyam and Hafez will be showcased.


Photo: supplied by the artist

Ipshita Pratap – Classical Indian Music

Ipshita hails from the picturesque northeastern state of Assam, India. She specialises in Indian classical music which is uniquely known for its emphasis on improvisation and intricate microtones. Because of its contemplative and spiritual nature, Indian classical music is usually a solitary pursuit that focuses on melodic development that gives texture, sensuality and a sense of purpose to the melody. Music has always been a sanctuary for Ipshita.


Photo: supplied by the artist

Levanya De Zoysa

The spectacle and intricate costuming of the most prominent form of traditional Sri Lankan dance, Kandyan, is extraordinary – Levanya’s powerful footwork and gestures bring the richness of Kandyan dance to Hobart stages.

Levanya De Zoysa has been dancing for almost her whole life and has been focussing on traditional forms of Sri Lankan dance for the past 10 years. She is a third year bachelor student at UTAS and takes great pleasure in sharing her culture with new people.


More Winter Light
  • Exhibitions
  • Festivals
  • Free
  • Kid Friendly
  • Performances
  • Salamanca Arts Curated
  • Winter Light
A close up of molten orange glass in a circular form.

A Warm Glow to Remember

Yumemi Hiraki
Wednesday 3 – Sunday 28 Aug 2022
Top Gallery
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  • Australian Antarctic Festival
  • Exhibitions
  • Festivals
  • Free
  • Kid Friendly
  • Performances
  • Salamanca Arts Curated
  • Winter Light
An image of an icebreaker moving through the Antarctic waters. The point of view is if you are looking the ship front on.

Last Dance Orange Roughy

John McCormick & Adam Nash
Thursday 11 – Sunday 28 Aug 2022
Sidespace Gallery
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  • Festivals
  • Kid Friendly
  • Performances
  • Salamanca Arts Curated
  • Winter Light
A photo of a Japanese woman from the shoulders up. She has a large colourful bow in her hair and has a red coloured fringe.

Random Acts of Weirdness

Risa Ray + Jem Nicholas + Georgia Shine
Friday 12 – Friday 19 Aug 2022
Long Gallery
Peacock Theatre
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  • Festivals
  • Live Music
  • Performances
  • Salamanca Arts Curated
  • Winter Light
A woman looks to be frozen on the ceiling. She wears blue clothing and the word 'live' in yellow sits across the image.

Body of Work (Live)

PARKER
Friday 19 – Saturday 20 Aug 2022
Long Gallery
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