Presented by Salamanca Arts Centre

This concert, performed by Ensemble Mania, is the third in the String Quartets # 1 Project (which was launched at Salamanca Arts Centre in August 2021). 

Three Tasmanian String Quartets # 1
Saturday 3 September
7:30pm – 9pm
Doors at 7pm
The Peacock Theatre

Ensemble Mania comprise
Peter Tanfield | 1st violin
Josh Farner | 2nd violin 
Damien Holloway | viola
James Anderson | cello

This concert program showcases the first string quartets by Tasmanian composers

Program

Simon Reade | String Quartet (Alba)

Marian Stankiewicz | Stanisław: String Quartet No. 1

Raffæle Marcellino | String Quartet No. 1

Program notes

Simon Reade – String Quartet (Alba)

Alba (Aubade)

Hyperion’s clear star is not yet risen.

Dawn brings a tenuous light across the earth,

The watcher to the sleeper cries, “Arise!”

Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;

She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!

Behold the ambush of the enemy

Stealing to take the heedless in their sleep,

And still the herald’s voice that cries “Arise!”

Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;

She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!

The North wind from Acturus now blows free,

The stars go into hiding in the sky,

And nearer to the sunrise swings the Plough.

Dawn over the dark sea brings on the sun;

She leans across the hilltop: see, the light!

(10th Century Manuscript,

English translation, Helen Waddell)


Marian Stankiewicz – Stanisław: String Quartet No. 1

Of the twelve works composed by Marian Stankiewicz in his short career, three are string quartets. The first of these is his 1974 quartet Stanisław, a name of Slavic origin that could be in reference to any number of people. The work is composed in four movements and employs some unique playing techniques and notation choices, particularly in the final movement which appears rhythmically freer with misaligned rhythmic values and very few barlines. (Program note by Dominic Flynn).


Raffæle Marcellino – String Quartet No. 1

This work was commissioned by Vincent Moleta for the 2003 Blackwood River Chamber Festival in West Australia, performed by Trigon Ensemble. The three movements are defined by their rhythmic style and temporal space. The musical premise for each movement can be described through the concepts of a:

1. dance, as a way of defining and traversing 2-dimensional space,

2. nocturne, with subtle lyricism as a proxy for moonlight and introspection, and

3. perpetuum mobile, of motoric iteration that defines space at the smallest dimension which invokes a larger continuum


Performers’ Biographies

Ensemble Mania was created with the goal to provide a unique listening experience in Tasmania, showcasing music that would otherwise not be heard on the island, while exemplifying the possibilities of a richer, more diverse music scene. This music includes the latest, most exciting composers, to the pillars of Australian modernism and lost masterpieces.

Born in England in 1961, Peter Tanfield started the violin aged four. He studied in Germany, Israel, Switzerland and Holland where his teachers were Igor Ozim, Felix Andrievski, Alberto Lysy, Herman Krebbers and Yehudi Menuhin. As soloist and chamber musician Tanfield has performed throughout Europe, China, Japan, India, Canada, the Middle East, Africa, USA and USSR. He was a prize-winner at The Carl Flesh International Competition, International Mozart Competition and International Bach Competition. He has recorded solo and chamber works for television and radio as well as CD. He has played for Chairman Deng Xiaoping in China and the Sultan of Oman. Tanfield led the Australian String Quartet from 1998 until 2001. As a soloist Tanfield has appeared with many orchestras; the Philharmonia, City of London Sinfonia, Scottish Chamber Orchestra, Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, and the RAI National Symphony Orchestra in Rome. As concertmaster he has worked with the BBC Philharmonic, RAI National Symphony Orchestra, Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Sinfonietta, and the Scottish Chamber Orchestra. He has performed with Astor Piazolla, Charlie Watts, Pinchas Zukerman, Yehudi Menuhin, Charles Wuorinen, Arvo Pärt, Graeme Koehne, Gary Carr, Carlo Maria Giulini, Mark Gasser and Itzhak Perlman.


Joshua Farner is from Hobart, Tasmania, and began playing the violin at the age of nine. Following completion of a Bachelor of Engineering with 1st class Honours, he was awarded a University of Tasmania String Scholarship and commenced a Bachelor of Music under the tutelage of Dr. Susan Collins. Josh has performed with the Tasmanian Discovery Orchestra and the Australian International Symphony Orchestra Institute (AISOI), and regularly performs as section leader and concertino player with the Hobart Chamber Orchestra. In 2018 Josh was awarded the D & MV McDonald Scholarship in Music from the University of Tasmania, allowing him to travel to London to study under renowned pedagogues Simon Fischer and David Takeno.


Damien Holloway studied viola in Hobart with Keith Crellin, Simon Oswell and Jan Sedivka, followed by postgraduate studies in Brisbane with Elizabeth Morgan. He played viola with the Queensland Symphony Orchestra, and was a founding member of Camerata of St Johns (Brisbane). He is principal viola of the Hobart Chamber Orchestra, and regularly fosters the performance of new music.


James Anderson is currently studying a Master of Teaching at the University of Tasmania, having completed his Bachelor of Music in 2018 studying under Sue-Ellen Paulsen. James has previously performed in the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, the Australian Youth Orchestra, the Australian International Symphony Orchestra Institute, the Jan Sedivka Camerata, and the Tasmanian Discovery Orchestra. In 2018 James worked with the ensemble Musik Fabrik in Cologne, while also spending time at the Royal Conservatory of Den Hague in the Netherlands.



Composers’ biographies

Simon Reade is a conductor, composer, educator, and trumpet player. He has filled commissions from the Tasmanian Youth Orchestra, the Festival of Voices (Tasmania), IHOS opera, the Hobart Chamber Orchestra, the Derwent Valley Band and the Tasmanian Composer’s Festival, amongst others. His music has been performed by such eminent performers as; Michael Kieran Harvey, Jabra Latham, Diego Campagna, Maurizio Barbetti, Duo Porto-Frontini, Luca Ferrini & Joze Kotar, Benjamin Price and Dr Matthew van Emmerik.



Marian Stankiewicz
 started his brief musical career at the age of fifteen by playing guitar with his father’s dance band. He enrolled at the Tasmanian Conservatorium of Music in 1972 to study classical guitar and composition, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Music in 1976. After graduation, Stankiewicz taught classical guitar at the Tasmanian Conservatorium of Music and appeared in a number of concert performances. He died in 1977, at the age of twenty-five.



Raffaele’s music embraces Western art music tradition with eclectic influences from other musical traditions such as jazz and non-western music and folk traditions. He studied composition at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, where his teachers included Richard Vella, Gillian Whitehead, Bozidar Kos and Richard Toop. Since graduation Raffaele has built a national and international profile as a composer in various genres of chamber music, orchestral music, opera, music theatre and radio works. He has been awarded various prizes and commissions, including an Australia Council Fellowship and the Lowin Prize for his work Canticle.
His music is available through the Australian Music Centre and Universal Music. He has written music for leading Australian and international artists and ensembles, including Ian Munro, The Seymour Group, the Song Company, Pipeline, Australia Ensemble, Halcyon, Sydney Philharmonia Choir and the Brandenburg Orchestra. Career highlights include a UNESCO-sponsored residency in Montreal with Nouvel Ensemble Moderne; the Melbourne Festival premiere of his opera Midnite; 10 Days on the Island premiere of The Flight of Les DarcyHeart of Fire music for the 2000 broadcast for the Sydney Paralympics; L’Arte di Volare performed by the Tasmanian Sydney Orchestra Strings; the Art of Resonance concerto for tuba performed by Steve Rosse and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra; and the ISCM performance of Maze by Ensemble Modern.


This event is presented by Salamanca Arts Centre and supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund

  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Female that can play 20s to 40s.

The actor will be playing multiple roles aged from early 20s to late 40s.

Auditions
Sunday 7 August
Peacock Theatre

Please email a headshot, full-length photo and a CV listing your acting experience by 3 August the Performing Arts Program Manager, Lucien Simon performingarts@sac.org.au

This is a paid opportunity.

Key Dates

  • – Attend two days of the creative development between 8 – 11 August 2022
  • – Attend rehearsals (Monday to Friday, 9am – 5pm) 13 November – 3 December 2022
  • – Attend Production week 5 – 8 December 2022
  • – Attend dress rehearsal, 8 December 2022
  • – Perform at the Peacock Theatre, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart on Opening Night (9 December 2022) and for performances on the 10, 11, 15, 16, 17 and 18 December 2022 and a matinee performance on the 10 December 2022.

Be available for re-staging and tour of Jumpcut in 2023.

About Jumpcut

At the beginning of 2022 Chris Mead (Melbourne Theatre Company, Head of theatre at the VCA) and Tasmanian writers, Mathew Cooke, Hera Fox, Stepnanie Jack, Carrie McLean and Andy Vagg, took part in the first stage of development of a new full length play titled Jumpcut (working title).

They are working together to create a full-length play with the underlying theme, ‘Crisis, what crisis?’. Structurally the play is being created by using the Arthur Schnitzler play Reigen/LaRonde (1900) as a structural template. It consists of 10 ‘love’ scenes between pairs of people up and down society’s then class structure. The 10 characters each play in two adjacent scenes, each with two discrete lovers.

Chris has created a play using this format before. In 2001-2 Chris worked with five writers—Ben Ellis, Veronica Gleeson, Nick Marchand, Tommy Murphy and Emma Vuletic—to create 360 positions in a one-night stand for the 2002 Festival of Sydney. The play was incredibly well accepted and fast tracked the careers of the writers involved. The collective quality of the work benefited everyone involved.

About the Director
Chris Mead

This year Chris was appointed the Head of Theatre at the Victorian College of the Arts, prior to this he was the Literary Director of Melbourne Theatre Company. Previous positions have included: inaugural Artistic Director of PlayWriting Australia; Literary Manager, Sydney Theatre Company; Literary Manager, Belvoir; curator, Australian National Playwrights’ Conference; and Festival Director, Interplay, the International Festival for Young Playwrights. Recent directing credits include Ross Mueller’s A Strategic Plan (Griffin 2016), Richard Frankland’s Walking into the Bigness (co-directed by Wayne Blair, Malthouse 2014), Ian Wilding’s Rare Earth (NIDA 2011) and Quack (Griffin 2010), and Damien Millar’s The Modern International Dead (Griffin 2008) which won Best New Play (Sydney Theatre Critics’ Awards) and the WA Premier’s Literary Award. He has a PhD from Sydney University. His Platform Paper on institutional racism and outreach strategies was published in 2008. In the past three years he has worked closely with writers such as Joanna Murray-Smith, David Williamson, Eddie Perfect, Lally Katz, Aidan Fennessy, Brendan Cowell, Hannie Rayson, Tom Holloway, Angela Betzien, Rob Sitch, Santo Cilauro and Tom Gleisner, and Steve Vizard, as well as emerging writers such as S. Shakthidharan, Anchuli Felicia King and Jean Tong.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Proudly presented by Salamanca Arts Centre.

Come and hear some of Hobart’s finest Gypsy Jazz artists play a ‘session’ like you have never heard before!
Curated and hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy, members of the musical community are encouraged to join in, just like they did back in the day.
Expect to be wowed by the music of the 1930’s Parisian Belle Epoque’ (Beautiful Era). This is the music that Monet, Renoir, Degas, Picasso, and Van Gogh listened to when they were out and about on their adventures.

Everyone is welcome!

Want to play along too?

If you are interested in participating in these sessions, then please register your interest below and Charlie will put your name on the list, and make sure there is a seat available for you.



Hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy and featuring local and travelling musicians of the highest calibre, the Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions differ from a regular musical performance in a few key ways.

This Gypsy Jazz Jam is based on how the genre was originally encountered in the 1930’s Parisian social scene, around a campfire fire/table or in a bar or even backstage during a gig where the musicians were formally booked to play for dances and would jam backstage for fun.

The Musicians will be seated in a circle facing each other, unrehearsed but with common repertoire and familiar calls/instructions/signals for on-the-spot arrangement decisions. All tunes are played from memory, no charts, just a list of common songs and everyone leads the song they nominate. Musicians can take a break whenever they like but the music is pretty much continuous and other musicians and even members of the audience are encouraged to join in and participate also! BYO instrument!

The audience is invited to be close to the music, and can move around the musicians, with the option of changing location at any time, go to the bar and enjoy a drink, chat and interact with friends, get in close to the musician you want to observe the most.

This session will not be amplified so move up close to hear the music as loud as you like.

The main goal being more fun for all.


Why these sessions are so special
The musicians are more relaxed and will be more communicative and adaptable to variation in the moment, they will play uninhibited and take musical risks to the enjoyment of all.

The audience engages with the musicians directly. Chats between tunes, observing the interactions first hand and even getting involved if you bring your instrument.

You hear the true sound of the instrument directly from the instrument, no amplification, no feedback, so that when identical instruments are soloing you can clearly see/hear who is doing what. These instruments have been around for hundreds of years and are already the perfect volume for this kind of music.


The Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions are presented by Salamanca Arts Centre as part of its Live Music Program, which is supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Proudly presented by Salamanca Arts Centre.

Come and hear some of Hobart’s finest Gypsy Jazz artists play a ‘session’ like you have never heard before!
Curated and hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy, members of the musical community are encouraged to join in, just like they did back in the day.
Expect to be wowed by the music of the 1930’s Parisian Belle Epoque’ (Beautiful Era). This is the music that Monet, Renoir, Degas, Picasso, and Van Gogh listened to when they were out and about on their adventures.

Everyone is welcome!

Want to play along too?

If you are interested in participating in these sessions, then please register your interest below and Charlie will put your name on the list, and make sure there is a seat available for you.



Hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy and featuring local and travelling musicians of the highest calibre, the Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions differ from a regular musical performance in a few key ways.

This Gypsy Jazz Jam is based on how the genre was originally encountered in the 1930’s Parisian social scene, around a campfire fire/table or in a bar or even backstage during a gig where the musicians were formally booked to play for dances and would jam backstage for fun.

The Musicians will be seated in a circle facing each other, unrehearsed but with common repertoire and familiar calls/instructions/signals for on-the-spot arrangement decisions. All tunes are played from memory, no charts, just a list of common songs and everyone leads the song they nominate. Musicians can take a break whenever they like but the music is pretty much continuous and other musicians and even members of the audience are encouraged to join in and participate also! BYO instrument!

The audience is invited to be close to the music, and can move around the musicians, with the option of changing location at any time, go to the bar and enjoy a drink, chat and interact with friends, get in close to the musician you want to observe the most.

This session will not be amplified so move up close to hear the music as loud as you like.

The main goal being more fun for all.


Why these sessions are so special
The musicians are more relaxed and will be more communicative and adaptable to variation in the moment, they will play uninhibited and take musical risks to the enjoyment of all.

The audience engages with the musicians directly. Chats between tunes, observing the interactions first hand and even getting involved if you bring your instrument.

You hear the true sound of the instrument directly from the instrument, no amplification, no feedback, so that when identical instruments are soloing you can clearly see/hear who is doing what. These instruments have been around for hundreds of years and are already the perfect volume for this kind of music.


The Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions are presented by Salamanca Arts Centre as part of its Live Music Program, which is supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Stand up for peace with this fundraiser for Ukrainians displaced by the Russian invasion. 

Join Les Nointers, featuring Lucien Simon and Cameron Healy from seminal 90s Tasmanian misfit stagger rock outfit DUST, flamenco metal queen Katherine Diaz Robayo and drum slinger Marcos Genaris. They are joined on stage by the Interiors, who’ve risen from the ashes of All Fires the Fire, to create a new brand of dark splendour. Closing the night will be our very own Russian defector Comrade Xero spinning her collection of banned communist electronica. Special guests for the evening will be Koko Flow and her band of yogis and yogini’s who will open the night with a chant for peace.

Throughout the night will be projected  a range of video art from Black Paul, Troy Melville and Lucien Simon.

All funds raised will be donated to UNICEF’s support for Ukrainian families and children.

https://www.unicef.org/emergencies/war-ukraine-pose-immediate-threat-children



  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

More Live Music in the Founders Room

Protea Impro are back! 

Upon popular request they Protea Impro will be serving a night of Theatre Sports at the Founders Room. 

  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Proudly presented by Salamanca Arts Centre.

Come and hear some of Hobart’s finest Gypsy Jazz artists play a ‘session’ like you have never heard before!
Curated and hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy, members of the musical community are encouraged to join in, just like they did back in the day.
Expect to be wowed by the music of the 1930’s Parisian Belle Epoque’ (Beautiful Era). This is the music that Monet, Renoir, Degas, Picasso, and Van Gogh listened to when they were out and about on their adventures.

Everyone is welcome!

Want to play along too?

If you are interested in participating in these sessions, then please register your interest below and Charlie will put your name on the list, and make sure there is a seat available for you.



Hosted by award winning virtuoso violinist Charlie McCarthy and featuring local and travelling musicians of the highest calibre, the Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions differ from a regular musical performance in a few key ways.

This Gypsy Jazz Jam is based on how the genre was originally encountered in the 1930’s Parisian social scene, around a campfire fire/table or in a bar or even backstage during a gig where the musicians were formally booked to play for dances and would jam backstage for fun.

The Musicians will be seated in a circle facing each other, unrehearsed but with common repertoire and familiar calls/instructions/signals for on-the-spot arrangement decisions. All tunes are played from memory, no charts, just a list of common songs and everyone leads the song they nominate. Musicians can take a break whenever they like but the music is pretty much continuous and other musicians and even members of the audience are encouraged to join in and participate also! BYO instrument!

The audience is invited to be close to the music, and can move around the musicians, with the option of changing location at any time, go to the bar and enjoy a drink, chat and interact with friends, get in close to the musician you want to observe the most.

This session will not be amplified so move up close to hear the music as loud as you like.

The main goal being more fun for all.


Why these sessions are so special
The musicians are more relaxed and will be more communicative and adaptable to variation in the moment, they will play uninhibited and take musical risks to the enjoyment of all.

The audience engages with the musicians directly. Chats between tunes, observing the interactions first hand and even getting involved if you bring your instrument.

You hear the true sound of the instrument directly from the instrument, no amplification, no feedback, so that when identical instruments are soloing you can clearly see/hear who is doing what. These instruments have been around for hundreds of years and are already the perfect volume for this kind of music.


The Salamanca Gypsy Jazz Sessions are presented by Salamanca Arts Centre as part of its Live Music Program, which is supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Live Music Fund.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

Post punk Tasmanian three-piece band, Liquid Nails have been a thing since 2019. Subtract two years of global pandemic and you could say, along with the glacial pace of offshore pressing and shipping, they have, in a timely fashion, banged out their debut LP!

The 12 inch, 45rpm self-titled album (in true punk tradition) delivers 10 blistering tracks that authentically replicates the band’s explosive and energetic live performances at pubs and clubs in their hometown of nipaluna (Hobart).

Liquid Nails are celebrating the release of this debut at the Founders Room, Salamanca Arts Centre, on Cubbyhouse Records (100 available).


Threats
Cruiser-charged fast hardcore. World record holders for most notes in a 36 second song. Unmissable on many levels.

Rabbit
Melodic nipaluna power pop and it’s absolute finest. They have one stellar 7-inch out and a debut album on the way.

Nice House (Debut Show)
With the median house price in Hobart at an all time encouragingly affordable $995,000, Nice House are here to ask and answer one question: Can rock and roll save this city?


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

More Live Music in the Founders Room

Friends, it’s been 3 years since Slag Queens released new music. They’ve been sitting on a new album called ‘Favours’ for a while now and it’s time you started to hear it.

Slag Queens are dropping a new track called ‘Dogs’ with a film clip shot by Jo Shrimpton (Flare Productions). To celebrate (and to wish Amber all the best on her 3 month stint in Naarm/Melbourne) Slag Queens will be playing at The Founders Room, Salamanca Arts Centre with good friends 𝔈ℭ𝔅 and Free Live Sports.


Slag Queens
Originally inspired by DIY no wave music and the feminist politics of Riot Grrl, Slag Queens learnt how to be a band by doing it. They like to write songs collaboratively and are wild for noisey, grainy sounds and sad-beautiful guitars. Their songs express the frustration of life under late capitalism and are a consciousness raising effort to get you mentally strong for the revolution (however that comes). 

𝔈ℭ𝔅
𝔈ℭ𝔅. is a hyperpop and dance music collective centralised under the aegis of a single YouTube account. By absorbing the plasticity of venues, fans, codecs and sound systems 𝔈ℭ𝔅 envisions new material for the club. As a collective, 𝔈ℭ𝔅, has been awarded performance opportunities in Norway, Portugal, Germany and the US and is highly regarded in underground communities across the globe. Server based in Nipaluna

Free Live Sports
Tasmanian-via-mainland three-piece Free Lives Sports started out as an excuse to mess around and try new things.
The result is a band constantly playing on the edge of its ability; pushing to make music that is catchier, hookier, darker, more difficult. Free Live Sports never let sounding a bit shit get in the way of a good tune, comparisons to bands like Dead Moon, Captain Beefheart and Guided by Voices are warranted, though their love of a pub-rock karaoke classic keeps it from getting all too experimental.


  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.


The Randall Muir Trio offers you some home cookin’, a celebration of the music associated with all that is soulful, from home-cooked chitlins to hard bop, blues and jazz.

The instrumentation of these jazz sub-genres often included Hammond organ, which was considered a less sophisticated jazz instrument, but one deeply connected with gospel and the blues. Guitar and drums are the perfect compliment to the Hammond, and Tenor Saxophone completes the sound.
Great groups with this instrumentation include Jack McDuff’s quartets and Jimmy Smith’s collaborations with Kenny Burrell and Stanley Turrentine.

Playing the repertoire of these groups and others will be Alistair Dobson on Tenor Saxophone, Aaron Entresz on Guitar, Tom Robb on drumkit and Randall Muir on Hammond organ.

Tickets $25 each or four tickets for $80


Jazzamanca is presented by Salamanca Arts Centre, and supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the Live Music Fund.

  • Supporters

    Salamanca Art Centre’s 2022 programs are supported by the Commonwealth Government’s Office of the Arts via the RISE Fund.

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